Website last updated: 20-8-2017

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27 June-2 July 2017
Guy Hamilton celebrated by Mallorca Film Commission at Atlántida

A celebration to the late British director Guy Hamilton (1922-2016), known for his James Bond films and other movie classics, will take place on the island of Mallorca during this year's Atlántida Film Fest. The filmmaker filmed, fell in love with and retired on the Spanish island.

Among the accolades, will be a photo exhibit entitled “Guy Hamilton, a Director’s Life Behind the Scenes”, with images of Mr. Hamilton directing and relaxing with his stars on his sets. The photographs were generously loaned to the organizers by the Hamilton family, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios (MGM), and EON Productions (the Bond production company). The festival will also screen some of Guy Hamilton’s films:

28 June - Goldfinger (1964)
5 July - Evil Under the Sun (1982)
12 July - Live and Let Die (1973)
19 July - The Man with the Golden Gun (1974)
26 July - Force 10 from Navarone (1978)

All screenings starts at 8pm and are organized by the Arxiu del So i l'Imatge (Mallorcan Film Library) from the Island's Council - and will be held at Centre de Cultura (Sa Nostra), C/ de la Concepció, 12 in Palma.

The opening gala for the festival will be held in the Bellver Castle overlooking Palma bay, and will include the participation of Britt Ekland, who worked with him in The Man with the Golden Gun, and FSWL founder Anders Frejdh who became a dear friend of Guy over the years and visited him several times in Mallorca. Anders comments:

"It's really great news that Mallorca Film Commission is organising a proper celebration of Guy who I know was a wonderful director and much loved and respected by his cast & crew. I really miss him and his sense of humour immensely but feel very privileged to have become friends with him."

Guy Hamilton in action during The Man with the Golden Gun at Pinewood Studios
Sir Roger Moore, who starred in two of the James Bond films directed by Guy Hamilton, was invited, and had sent a personal note to be read during the homage. The beloved British actor, who passed away on May 23 earlier this year, will be remembered at the festival events and the opening gala.

The gala will include a clips tribute and a live concert by the Chamber Film Orchestra, featuring some of the sound tracks of films directed by Mr. Hamilton, followed by a gala dinner.

Guy Hamilton was one of the most successful British directors to depict World War II and the subsequent Cold War era in film. He was born in Paris to a British diplomat, and worked for Paramount News in England before joining the Royal Navy, where he performed admirably and received several medals for his valor.

Hamilton began his film career in 1948 as an assistant for Carol Reed in “The Fallen Idol”, and the classic “The Third Man”, starring Orson Welles. He also worked as an assistant director for John Huston in another legendary production, “The African Queen”, with the great Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn.

He began directing his own productions in 1952 with “The Ringer” and went on to share the credits with some of the most important stars of the second half of the 20th century.

Hamilton directed four James Bond films: Goldfinger, Diamonds Are Forever (1971), Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun.

His World War II films are considered masterpieces of their genre, and include “The Colditz Story” (1955) with John Mills, “Funeral in Berlin” (1967) starring Michael Caine, “Battle of Britain” (1969) with the great Laurence Olivier, Trevor Howard, Christopher Plummer and Susannah York, to name a few, and “Force 10 from Navarone” (1978), with Harrison Ford in his first protagonist role.

Hamilton directed “Evil Under the Sun” (1982) in Mallorca, with Peter Ustinov, Maggie Smith and Jane Birkin as its leading protagonists.

He fell under the spell of the island, and retired in Mallorca with his wife Kerima and his son Frank. He built a home on top of a mountain facing the sea on Port d’Andratx, and lived there until his passing on April 20, 2016, at the age of 93. A proposal has been made to the Island Council to bestow the title of “Adopted Son of Mallorca” posthumously to the filmmaker.

The homage to Guy Hamilton is organised by the Mallorca Film Commission, in the frame of the convention of collaboration between the Foundation Mallorca Tourism of the Council of Mallorca and the ATB of the Government of the Balearic Islands.

Guy Hamilton celebration at Atlantida Film Fest 2017


For updates and the latest news on Atlántida Film Fest in Mallorca, visit the official website.

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20 APRIL 2016
FILM DIRECTOR GUY HAMILTON (1922-2016)

FSWL is extremely sad to report yet another passing of a cherished member of the 'James Bond family' and a very dear friend & supporter of this website. Legendary film director Guy Hamilton (born in Paris on 16th September 1922) who directed four of the most classic Bond films (Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun) has died at the age of 93. We send our deepest condolences to his stepson and the rest of Guy's family and thank him for his HUGE contribution to the 007 phenomenon.

"You can't really change the formula, you can merely try to film it your way."
Guy Hamilton [on the Bond film series]

So far 2016 has been a terrible year for the Bond world as Hamilton’s death comes soon after losing iconic production designer Ken Adam (1921-2016).

FSWL founder Anders Frejdh comments:
"Totally devastated to hear about the passing of Guy who I last visited just over a year ago at his home in Mallorca. He was, and forever will be, someone I am always in debt to as he graciously supported From Sweden With Love all the way from its early days on the web in 2004. Miss him, his wit, kindness and friendship already more than I can explain. Last spoke to him in February. Shortly thereafter he fell, broke his hip and became hospitalised. When I spoke to his stepson two weeks ago he was recuperating well but most sadly declined in health after that. Rest in peace my friend, you will forever remain in my heart as one of nicest people I have ever met."

Michael G. Wilson and Barbara Broccoli (current James Bond producers) commented via the official website (007.com):
"We mourn the loss of our dear friend Guy Hamilton who firmly distilled the Bond formula in his much celebrated direction of Goldfinger and continued to entertain audiences with Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die and The Man with the Golden Gun. We celebrate his enormous contribution to the Bond films."

And Roger Moore (James Bond in two of Guy's 007 films) via Twitter:
"Incredibly, incredibly saddened to hear the wonderful director Guy Hamilton has gone to the great cutting room in the sky. 2016 is horrid."

Friends and colleagues who left a comment for FSWL of the beloved director:
"Guy for me - set the compass for Bond, indeed Harry and Cubby were talent seekers and promoters, think of Maurice Binder (who could be credited with creating the music video genre and designer of the Bond logo) - and Ken Adams as the style and scene Meister of James Bond and you have the secret key to the formula, the 007 Trinity. I easily imagine Harry and Cubby at a onset table somewhere, pasta's on the boil the setting and Maurice is impatiently waiting his turn and then Harry tells a joke and Maurice laughs in his unique cadence and Ken swirls his cognac in a large snifter, drawing deeply on his Monte Cristo and then Guy calls "Cut!" ... it's only a Scene from a movie ... God, how fortunate we were to be able to consider these passionate people part of our Bond family!" – Steven Saltzman (son of Harry Saltzman)

"Very sad news about Guy. A true British gentleman and one of the Bond originals. Of his four Bonds my favourite was Goldfinger. What a fantastic movie. Janine and I spent a very enjoyable weekend with Guy in Paris a couple of years ago and got to know him really well. He told us some very amusing stories of his escapades in the Navy during the Second World War. Because of his fluent French he was engaged in landing agents in Brittany and on one occasion was stranded there when his boat had to leave suddenly.
My first encounter with Guy was in 1947 when he was assistant to Carol Reed on The Third Man and I was a lowly assistant editor." – John Glen (Director of five James Bond films)

"I am so sorry that Peter Janson-Smith's death has been followed so quickly by Guy Hamilton. I got to know him originally when I was in my teens because his mother lived in our village."
Andrew Lycett (Ian Fleming biographer)

"The GREAT GUY HAMILTON !!! I'm an Actor with lots of IDEAS and for each one he would say to me, 'All right, show me.' I would, then he'd say, 'All right now show him.' By "him" he meant the terrific crusty old Aussie D.P. [who shot the film] I'd do it again and the DP would always chuckle and say, 'AYUP', Guy would then say , 'All right lets shoot it.' THANK YOU GUY !!! He let me bring in the FUNNY to Diamonds [Are Forever] "The funniest BOND film moment ever" according to Sir Roger Moore (Thank you SIR.) was the final MR. WINT - OOOH moment as the kindly SEAN lifts up his "YAA – HAA" [and flips him over the side of the ship!] The first gift GUY gave me was after I'd been given the part of one of the 2 GAY killers , the 1st time in film history that 2 guys were clearly identified as GAY, I asked GUY to not tell which one I'd be playing. He said, 'Really, why?' He'd never auditioned [me] but he had an instinct for me and casting in general - like seeing that Putter [Smith] should be one of the guys. I answered 'I don't know why, [AND I DIDN'T] I just don't want to know.' He agreed and made sure NOBODY including Putter told me that I was Mr. Wint. There I was on the desert set outside of VEGAS two hours before my 1st time on CAM and I still didn't KNOW. Bold crazy move on my part CRAZY CRAZY CRAZY !!!! That's me. THANKS GUY!!!
Bruce Glover (Diamonds Are Forever)

"The brave and kind Guy Hamilton impacted my life in an unforeseen way. He came to see Thelonious Monk at Shelley Manne's jazz club in Hollywood during the casting of Diamonds Are Forever (I was playing with the great pianist)
When Guy, whom everyone on the set called 'the Guv' or 'Guv', asked me to be in the film I was flabbergasted. I had to say yes even though acting had NEVER crossed my mind. Guv was kind and helpful and got me through with the help of my wife.
I am very grateful to the Guv. And I still feel unworthy of accolades and requests for autographs since I did nothing to earn what happened - it's like someone congratulating your financial wisdom for having won the lottery." – Putter Smith (Mr. Kidd in Diamonds Are Forever)

"RIP Guy Hamilton, a great Director and a lovely man!" – John Richardson (SFX maestro and son of Cliff Richardson who Guy also worked with)

"I am saddened, devastated and will never forget the friendship and kindness given by the wonderful Guy Hamilton. Diamonds and Guy ... are forever ... Damn damn damn!
Direct something wonderful in heaven. Rest vibrant man."
Lana Wood (Plenty O'Toole in Diamonds Are Forever)

"Very sad news. A very good director. RIP, Mr. Nice Guy. You were a Gentleman in our business."
Terry Mountain (Blofeld guard in Diamonds Are Forever)

"So sad ... RIP Guy Hamilton." – Caron Gardner (Flying Circus Pilot in Goldfinger)

"I was so honored to have worked with Guy. God Bless his Soul!" – Trina Parks (Thumper in Diamonds Are Forever)

"I am so very sorry to hear about Guy Hamilton. Both he and Roger were absolute gentle men who transformed my life over 3 blissful days." – Madeline Smith (Miss Caruso in Live and Let Die)

About Guy Hamilton:
Guy Hamilton was born in Paris, France where his English parents were living at the time. Remaining in France during the Nazi occupation, he was active in the French Resistance. After the end of the war, he started to work as an assistant to Carol Reed on films including The Fallen Idol (1948) and The Third Man (1949), before turning to directing with his first film The Ringer (1952). He worked on a total of 36 films (22 as director) from the 1940s to the 1980s, including four instalments based on the James Bond novels by Ian Fleming.

Hamilton was one of many directors who turned down Dr. No (1962) but eventually entered the series after Terence Young's departure from Goldfinger. He left during pre-production of The Spy Who Loved Me (1977).

Actors and actresses from the Bond films remember working with Guy:

"As I recall, the actor who was to be Hamilton got sick or for some reason could not keep the commitment. Roger asked Guy, 'Why not let Bob do it', and Guy agreed I should play Hamilton."
Bob Dix (Live and Let Die)

"At the time, I was very frightened of Guy as he was a very precise and demanding director, but, having met him in recent years to talk about the Bond film I must say he is a fabulous man, and certainly not someone I had to be scared of." – Britt Ekland (Mary Goodnight in The Man with the Golden Gun)

"He knew what he wanted and I hope I gave him what he asked of me. Directing Bond is probably less about the actors and more about the overall pace and style of the film. Guy was a veteran director who knew his stuff." – David Hedison (Felix Leiter in Live and Let Die)

"Guy is beyond adorable! He let me do whatever I wanted with my character, was fun to be around. And I recall he and his wife were robbed in Las Vegas while they slept!" – Lana Wood

"Guy Hamilton was generous in how much you were allowed to stray even slightly from the written script. But you didn’t try to do it too often." – Shane Rimmer (Tom in Diamonds Are Forever)

Hamilton was originally chosen to direct Superman in 1978, but due to his status as a tax exile he was only allowed to be in England for thirty days, where production had moved at the last minute to Pinewood Studios. The job of director was then passed to Richard Donner, but Hamilton insisted he'd be paid in full. Guy put the money to good use, building a beautiful house on the idyllic island of Mallorca!

In the 1980s, Guy Hamilton was also approached to direct Batman (1989) after producer Michael Uslan imagined that Batman would be a franchise in the 007 mould. According to Bruce Scivally, author of Billion Dollar Batman, Uslan said they "had some talks" with Hamilton, but producers Peter Guber and Jon Peters were thinking of a more comedic approach and went to Ivan Reitman, then Joe Dante, who said yes, but eventually dropped out because he "just didn't believe in it." That was in 1984, and the project went through many other hands before Tim Burton took it on.

After retiring from the film business in the early 1990's, Guy enjoyed playing golf (a sport he introduced Sean Connery to for the filming of Goldfinger) and contributed to a variety of literature including the forward to On the Tracks of 007 (published in 2008) by FSWL contributor Martijn Mulder. The introduction for the official programme to the 50th Anniversary celebration of Goldfinger in Oslo 2014, and several hours being interviewed for Some Kind Of Hero: The Remarkable Story of the James Bond films (2012) written by FSWL contributors Ajay Chowdhury & Matthew Field. Guy also attended many Bond events such as the spectacular Vue sur Bond in Canada (hosted by Hilary Saltzman, daughter of Harry) that FSWL was most fortunate to attend as well.

Guy is survived by his stepson Frank. His wife of many years, Keri, passed away in July 2014. (Before Keri, he was married to actress Naomi Chance.)



A selection of Guy Hamilton's other films: (IMDB profile)
• The Intruder (1953)
• An Inspector Calls (1954)
• The Colditz Story (1955) (which he also co-wrote)
• Charley Moon (1956)
• Manuela (1957)
• A Touch of Larceny (1959)
• The Devil's Disciple (1959)
• The Best of Enemies (1962)
• Man in the Middle (1963)
• The Party's Over (1965)
Funeral in Berlin (1966, produced by Harry Saltzman)
Battle of Britain (1969, with Curd Jürgens and Robert Shaw among others, also produced by Harry Saltzman)
Force 10 from Navarone (1978, with Robert Shaw, Barbara Bach, Edward Fox and Richard Kiel)
• The Mirror Crack'd (1980)
• Evil under the Sun (1982)
• Remo Williams: The Adventure Begins (1985)
• Try this One for Size (1989)

Click here to listen to film director Guy Hamilton discuss the ingredients of a successful Bond movie and looks back at a career that started with his apprenticeship in the French film business at the age of 17. The director maintains that, in his opinion, although the Bond films defy the formulaic, one of the golden rules in their production is to put the money up on the screen, particularly with the sets and stunts, which should look as expensive and spectacular as possible. His take on Bond is that the secret agent is a Latter-day Saint George, albeit a lecherous one, and the villains he faces represent the dragon.

Other obituaries of Guy Hamilton:
>BBC News (21-4-2016)
>British Film Institute (21-4-2016)
>Daily Mail (21-4-2016)
>Empire (21-4-2016)
>Hollywood Reporter (21-4-2016)
>The Independent (21-4-2016)
>Telegraph (21-4-2016)
>The Guardian (21-4-2016)
>Variety (21-4-2016)

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors featured on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
Guy Hamilton in Mallorca. Photo by Anders Frejdh. © 2016 From Sweden with Love.

More information about Guy Hamilton's fabulous career in films on Screen Online:

www.screenonline.org.uk/people/id/502623/

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#guy_hamilton
#in_memoriam

1 AUGUST 2015
A CELEBRATION OF BRITISH DIRECTOR SAM MENDES

A celebration of the much respected British director Sam Mendes, member of the 'James Bond family' since 2011.

With this special page, From Sweden with Love would like to celebrate Sam Mendes on his 50th birthday.

"Dear Sam - very best wishes for you birthday. Keep up the great work."

About Sam Mendes:
Sam Mendes began his theatre career as Assistant Director at the Chichester Festival Theatre and was the first Artistic Director of the Minerva in 1989. In 1992, he founded the Donmar Warehouse where he was the Artistic Director until 2002.

While at the Donmar Warehouse, he directed Assassins (Olivier and Evening Standard awards), Translations, Cabaret, Glengarry Glen Ross, The Glass Menagerie (Olivier Award), Company (Olivier Award), Habeas Corpus, The Front Page, The Blue Room, To the Green Fields Beyond, Uncle Vanya (Olivier and Evening Standard awards) och Twelfth Night (Olivier and Evening Standard awards). In the West End: The Cherry Orchard (Critic's circle Award), The Plough and the Stars, Kean, London Assurance and Oliver!, which ran for 4 years at the London Palladium.

In 2009, his transatlantic company, The Bridge Project, debuted with productions of A Winter's Tale and The Cherry Orchard led by Simon Russell Beale and Ethan Hawke. The plays opened in New York and arrived at the Old Vic in May of 2009 after an international tour. In 2010, The Bridge Project entered its second year with productions of As You Like It and The Tempest, led by Stephen Dillane. The third and final season in 2011 had Kevin Spacey taking the lead in Richard III. In 2013 his production of Charlie & the Chocolate Factory opened in London's West End.

Film credits include American Beauty (Oscar® Best Director and Best Picture, Golden Globe, DGA Award), Road to Perdition (2002), Jarhead (2005), Revolutionary Road (2008), Away We Go (2009) and Skyfall (2012) (2012).

He has been the recipient of the Director's Guild Lifetime Achievement Award and the Olivier Award for Outstanding Achievement in the theatre. He was made a CBE in 2000.

Sam Mendes returned to the Bond franchise in 2014 as director of SPECTRE (2015).

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
Sam Mendes after the first press conference for Skyfall in November 2011. Photo by David Dettman. © EON Productions. All rights reserved.

For more information about Sam Mendes, check out his profile on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0005222/

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4 JUNE 2015
A CONVERSATION WITH DIRECTOR JOHN GLEN

The Space (Southern Performance and Creative Energies), a unique regular Brighton based entertainment and arts event with exclusive special guest interviews, welcomes legendary James Bond films director and editor John Glen and acclaimed singer/songwriter Badly Drawn Boy on Thursday 4th June at 8pm.

The event, sponsored by Brighton Film School, is hosted by Lisa Holloway and the doors open at 7.15pm.

About John Glen:
Best known for his directing and editing work on eight James Bond films, from the 1960s to the 1980s. He has directed more Bond films than anyone else, which are For Your Eyes Only (1981), Octopussy (1983) (1983), A View to a Kill (1985), The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989). During the 60s and the 70s, he worked as a second unit director on films such as The Italian Job (1969), Superman: The Movie (1978) and The Wild Geese (1978). John also was the editor and 2nd unit director for three other Bond films - On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979) (1979). This legendary James Bond figure is certainly an established member of the so-called family associated with the hugely successful film franchise.

Editor's note:
John is currently working on an updated and revised version of his autobiography (For My Eyes Only) for publication in the fall to coincide with the release of the 24th James Bond film, SPECTRE.

For more James Bond events presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
John Glen with actress Kristina Wayborn and SFX maestro John Richardson during a conversation before our special screening of Octopussy at the Film House in Stockholm in 2014. Photo by Cawa Media. © From Sweden with Love.

Book a ticket for the event with John Glen on the official website:

www.thespace.uk.com

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15 MAY 2015
A CELEBRATION OF BOND DIRECTOR JOHN GLEN

A celebration of editor, 2nd unit director and James Bond film director John Glen on his birthday. John holds the record for directing the most James Bond films, with a total of 5; this is every Bond film in the 1980’s.

With this page, From Sweden with Love would like to celebrate John Glen and officially thank him for accepting our invitation to come to our James Bond festival in Stockholm on 19-21 September 2014.

"Happy birthday John, your contribution to the James Bond film series and legacy of 007 are forever!"

Friends and colleagues from the James Bond films on John Glen:

"John would keep all the very worst takes, including me scratching my crotch or blinking whenever I fired a gun. All in good fun, and incredibly bad taste, and most definitely for our eyes only."
Sir Roger Moore

"Very hard working director, a pleasure to work for." – Albert Moses, Saddrudin in Octopussy

"John was totally professional and easy-going. Inconceivable that he would have been badly tempered!" – Andreas Wisniewski, Necros in The Living Daylights

"John was always great fun to work with and because of his background as an Editor he knew exactly what he wanted, what he needed and how it would all work together. So refreshing to work like that, especially in today’s world." – John Richardson, SFX, miniatures, model and visual effects supervisor on nine James Bond films

"One of the nicest men I've ever met. He is a well-grounded Taurian and completely unflappable in all circumstances. Still today I'm immensely grateful that he chose me to play Magda in Octopussy." – Kristina Wayborn

"A very cozy man, just like Desmond Llewelyn [Q in 17 James Bond films]. Sympathetic, calm and a very kind gentleman. Never heard him say a bad word about anyone." – Mary Stavin, one of the circus girls in Octopussy and Kimberley Jones in A View to a Kill

"John is a very amiable man, who always had a smile on his face. Lovely to see him at the 30th anniversary reunion of Octopussy in 2013." – Safira Afzal, one of the circus girls in Octopussy

"Gentle. Kind. Genius." – Virginia Hey, Rubavich in The Living Daylights

About John Glen:
John Glen was born in Sunbury-on-Thames, England, UK.

He is a giant in the Bond world with credits from no less than eight movies in the series. He was editor / 2nd Unit Director for On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979) (1979).

John was offered the chance to direct For Your Eyes Only (1981) and continued to direct every other James Bond film in the 80's; Octopussy (1983) (1983), A View to a Kill (1985), The Living Daylights (1987) and Licence to Kill (1989).

John also worked with Roger Moore on several occasions outside the James Bond series. With Roger in a starring role, he was second unit director on Gold (1974), Shout at the Devil (1976) and The Wild Geese (1978). In 1980 he directed Roger in The Sea Wolves. Among other film credits from John Glen's amazing career are director of Christopher Columbus: The Discovery (1992) and The Point Men (2001)

In 2001, John Glen came out with his autobiography For My Eyes Only: My Life with James Bond which we strongly recommend every Bond scholar to read.

In September 2007, we interviewed John exclusively for FSWL and Roger Moore's official website, read our interview with John Glen.

In 2012, for the 50th anniversary of the first James Bond film (Dr. No), John has attended various special events including a director's panel in Las Vegas and a film festival in Oman.

John is currently working on an updated and revised version of his autobiography for publication in the fall to coincide with the release of the 24th James Bond film, SPECTRE.

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
John Glen with Paul Johnston, British Ambassador in Sweden, at our James Bond gala in Stockholm on 20th September 2014. Photo by Cawa Media. © From Sweden with Love.

For more information about John Glen's film career, check out his profile on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0322515/

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10 FEBRUARY 2015
A CELEBRATION OF DIRECTOR MICHAEL APTED

A celebration of the talented and acclaimed British actor and documentary filmmaker Michael Apted, member of the 'James Bond family' since 1999.

With this special page, From Sweden with Love would like to celebrate Michael Apted on his birthday.

"Dear Michael, happy birthday and keep up the great work."

About Michael Apted:
Michael Apted (born in England 1941) studied law and history at University of Cambridge. In 1963, he began working with research assignments for Granada Television. Within a few years he had become a reporter (World in Action) and television director (Coronation Street).

He made his debut as a film director in 1972 with The Triple Echo starring Oliver Reed and Glenda Jackson. During the 1970s, he directed Stardust (1974) with David Essex, The Squeeze (1976) with Stacy Keach and Agatha (1979) starring Vanessa Redgrave and Dustin Hoffman.

Michael Apted directed his first American film in 1980, Loretta with Sissy Spacek in the title role. The film received seven Oscar nominations and Sissy Spacek won an Academy Award for her portrayal of country singer Loretta Lynn. Apted then directed Continental Divide (1981) with John Belushi, Kipperbang (1982), Gorky Park (1983) starring William Hurt and Lee Marvin and Firstborn (1984).

He then directed a documentary film about Sting called Bring on the Night and the comedy Critical Condition (1987) with Richard Pryor. Then came the fivefolded Oscar nominated drama Gorillas in the Mist (1988) where Sigourney Weaver portrayed the gorilla researcher.

In 1989, Apted travelled to Russia to film the documentary The Long Way Home about rock star Boris Grebenshikov. In 1990 he directed Class Action, a courtroom drama starring Gene Hackman and Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio. The same year Apted directed the pilot and the first episode of the TV series My Life and Time.

In 1992, Apted directed three films; 35 Up, Incident at Oglala and Thunderheart. The documentary 35 Up is about 14 English schoolchildren Apted has followed since 1963. He has met and filmed the group every seven years. Both 35 Up and the previous documentary about the group, 28 Up, has been awarded. Apted also acted as executive producer on the American and Russian versions of the Up series, 14 Up In America and 14 Up in Russia.

The thriller, Thunderheart starring Val Kilmer and Sam Shepard, is about two FBI agents who investigate a murder in an Indian reservation. The murder is part of a conspiracy to crush the Indians. By chance, Apted's documentary Incident at Oglala (produced by Robert Redford), is about events which took place in the Indian Reservation in South Dakota in the 1970s.

In 1994, Apted directed the thriller Blink with Madeleine Stowe and Aidan Quinn in the lead roles. The same year, the director's documentary Moving the Mountain premiered at Human Rights Watch International Film Festival. The multi award winning film is about the events leading up to the massacre in Tiananmen Square on June 4th, 1989, and what happened next. In 1994, he also directed Nell with Jodie Foster in the title role as the woman who grew up completely isolated in the Smoky Mountains and speak her own language. Liam Neeson portrays the doctor who finds her and Natasha Richardson the psychologist who want her to be disposed of. Foster received an Oscar nomination for the role and the film grossed over 100 million dollars.

In 1996, Apted directed a thriller about medical ethics, Extreme Measures with Hugh Grant, Gene Hackman and Sarah Jessica Parker. He then followed a series of musical performers and artists, including David Bowie and Roy Lichtenstein, to show how artistic creativity works. This resulted in the documentary film Inspirations which premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival in 1997.

In 1998, he directed Always Outnumbered, a film about a former thief who tries to start a new life in Los Angeles. The lead role was played by Laurence Fishburne. The same year, BBC broadcast Apted's documentary 42 Up, the sixth film about the school class that he has followed since 1963. In 1999, Apted was given the Career Achievement Award from the International Documentary Association.

After the 19th James Bond film The World Is Not Enough (1999), Michael Apted directed Enigma (2001), Enough (2002), three episodes of the popular television series Rome (2005), Amazing Grace (2006) with Albert Finney (Kincade in Skyfall), The Chronicles of Narnia: The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (2010), Hallelujah (2011) and Chasing Mavericks (2012).

He has also continued his documentary work about the lives of the children from the 1963 school class with two additional films in recent years; 49 Up (2005) and 56 Up released in 2012.

In August 2011, Michael Apted interviewed a director colleague from the Bond universe, our good friend Guy Hamilton, on behalf of the Directors Guild of America. The over two-hour long interview can be seen on the DGA website.

Michael Apted has just finished shooting Unlocked with Swedish actress Noomi Rapace in the lead role.

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Birthdays for other Key Members of the James Bond cast and crew on From Sweden with Love:
>Barbara Broccoli (June 18)
>Ben Whishaw (October 14)
>Chris Corbould (June 24)
>Daniel Craig (March 2)
>Daniel Kleinman (December 23)
>David Arnold (January 23)
>Gary Powell (September 10)
>George Lazenby (September 5)
>Guy Hamilton (September 16)
>Judi Dench (December 9)
>John Glen (May 15)
>Ken Adam (February 5)
>Lewis Gilbert (March 6)
>Martin Campbell (October 24)
>Michael G. Wilson (January 21)
>Neal Purvis (September 9)
>Norman Wanstall (September 30)
>Paul Weston (January 7)
>Per Hallberg (December 30)
>Peter Lamont (November 12)
>Pierce Brosnan (May 16)
>Ralph Fiennes (December 22)
>Robert Wade (September 16)
>Roger Moore (October 14)
>Rory Kinnear (February 17)
>Sam Mendes (August 1)
>Sean Connery (August 25)
>Shirley Bassey (January 8)
>Timothy Dalton (March 21)
>Willy Bogner Jr (January 23)

Photo above:
Press photo of Michael Apted for The World Is Not Enough. Photo by Keith Hamshere. © 1999 Danjaq LLC. & Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM). All rights reserved.

For more information about Michael Apted, check out his profile on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0000776/

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24 OCTOBER 2013
A CELEBRATION OF DIRECTOR MARTIN CAMPBELL

Birthday of Martin Campbell, the talented director from New Zealand with two James Bond films among his credits. In 1995 he directed Pierce Brosnan in GoldenEye (1995), Brosnan's first Bond film, and in 2006 he directed Daniel Craig in his first film as James Bond, Casino Royale.

With this dedicated page, we would like to celebrate Martin Campbell on his birthday.

"Dear Martin, happy birthday and warm regards from Sweden. We are really looking forward to see you again in the director's chair for a James Bond film."

About Martin Campbell:
Born in New Zealand, Campbell moved to London where he began his career as a cameraman. He went on to produce the controversial British feature film Scum, as well as Black Joy, which was selected for competition at the Cannes Film Festival. Campbell made his directorial debut on British television on the police action series The Professionals (1978-1980) and continued with two more popular BBC series Shoestring (1980) and Minder (1980).

Considered one of the UK’s top directors by the mid-1980s, he directed the highly praised British television film Reilly: Ace of Spies (1983). Edge of Darkness (1985), a five-hour mini-series directed for the BBC, about nuclear contamination in England depicting murder and high-ranking corruption, won six BAFTA awards. (In 2010, he directed the film version.)

Campbell’s first Hollywood movie was Criminal Law (1988), and he went on to direct Defenceless (1991) and No Escape (1994). His American television credits include directing HBO’s “Cast a Deadly Spell” and two episodes of NBC’s “Homicide: Life on the Street.”

Following GoldenEye (1995), he directed the international blockbuster The Mask of Zorro (1998) starring Catherine Zeta-Jones and Antonio Banderas, which earned Academy Award® and Golden Globe nominations, Vertical Limit (2000) with Izabella Scorupco, Beyond Borders (2003), and The Legend of Zorro (2005), again starring Zeta-Jones and Banderas.

In January 2012, Martin participated in a James Bond director's panel in Las Vegas that kick-started the 50th Anniversary celebrations of the 007 film series.

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
Inscribed photo from director Martin Campbell to FSWL's founder. © From Sweden with Love.

For more information about Martin Campbell, check out his profile on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0132709/

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27 NOVEMBER 2010
NSNA DIRECTOR IRVIN KERSHNER (1923-2010)

Never Say Never Again director Irvin Kershner has passed away.

Irvin Kershner - the man who gave us some of the most indelible moments in cinema history with The Empire Strikes Back (1980) - has died. He was 87.

Kersh, as he was fondly known, died at his home following a long illness.

He was, of course, best known for directing The Empire Strikes Back, arguably the greatest chapter in the Star Wars saga (and which celebrates its thirtieth anniversary this year). But Kershner also made contributions to other franchises, directing RoboCop 2 and Sean Connery's last appearance as James Bond in the 'unofficial' 007 flick, Never Say Never Again (1983).

Having fought in World War II, Kershner began his career by teaching film at the University of Southern California, but quickly made the move behind the camera via a detour as a stills photographer and TV director, calling the shots on Stakeout On Dope Street in 1958.

A decent career followed, in which he directed the likes of Sean Connery in A Fine Madness, Richard Harris in The Return Of A Man Called Horse, and Faye Dunaway in 1978's Eyes Of Laura Mars (based on John Carpenter's screenplay).

It was this movie that persuaded George Lucas, looking for someone to take the reins on his Star Wars sequel, to approach Kershner to direct The Empire Strikes Back. The rest is movie history: Kershner's no-frills storytelling style, coupled with a strong script and an imaginative visual pallet, gave Empire a gravitas that marked it out as an instant classic.

Kershner only directed twice more on film, with Never Say Never Again and Robocop 2, but he also made a habit of appearing in films, showing up in Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation Of Christ and, of all places, Steven Seagal's On Deadly Ground.

His last contribution to film was a cameo as Statistics Professor in the 2005 film, Berkeley - but Kershner's unmistakeable contribution to film history had already been made. For Yoda, for Vader telling Luke, "I am your father", for Cloud City, for Lando, for the battle of Hoth, for the asteroid field chase, for Boba Fett, for Lobot, for Wampas, for Tauntauns, for "I thought they smelt bad... on the outside!", for "I love you"/"I know", for Chewie screaming in pain as Han is frozen in carbonite, and for the Empire striking back, we'll never forget the legendary Irvin Kershner. Rest in peace, Kersh.

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Read more about Irvin Kershner and his career on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0449984/

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#in_memoriam

TOBY HEFFERMAN (DIRECTOR)

2nd Assistant Director on DIE ANOTHER DAY, CASINO ROYALE and QUANTUM OF SOLACE

Toby Hefferman, who is a great guy, is a talented and promising young director who has been involved in several major film productions already.

In 2011, Toby worked as first assistant director on World War Z starring Brad Pitt and Matthew Fox. (The film will be released in 2013.)

In early 2012, Toby completed his work on Mr. Invisible, a short film starring Julian Glover.

Toby Hefferman is fundraising for The Julian Budd Kids in Sport Trust - Support his cause here.

He has already completed several marathons around the world despite his busy schedule. FSWL really admires his courage!

Toby ran the London marathon 2008 for the charity and raised more than 12,000 GBP, read more about it here.

His CV is full of merits and experience and include over 40 films:

2012: Therese Raquin (first assistant director)
2012: Wrath of the Titans (first assistant director: second unit)
2012: John Carter of Mars (1st assistant director: 2nd unit)
2011: Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (First AD: 2nd unit)
2011: The Eagle (1st assistant director: 2nd unit)
2010: Clash of the Titans (1st assistant director: aerial unit)
2010: Albatross (1st assistant director)
2010: Wild Target (1st assistant director)
2009: The Disappearance of Alice Creed (1st assistant director)
2008: Quantum of Solace (2nd assistant director)
2008: John Adams (TV mini-series) (1st assistant director)
2008: The Other Boleyn Girl (1st assistant director)
2008: Spiderwick (1st assistant director)
2007: Sweeney Todd (2nd assistant director)
2007: The Golden Compass (1st assistant director)
2006: Casino Royale (2nd assistant director)
2006: Death of the Revolution (short) (1st assistant director)
2006: The Da Vinci Code (2nd assistant director)
2005: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2nd assistant director)
2004: Moth (short) (1st assistant director)
2004: Closer (2nd assistant director)
2004: Troy (2nd assistant director: 2nd unit)
2003: Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life (2nd assistant director: 2nd unit)
2003: My House in Umbria (TV movie) (2nd assistant director)
2003: It's All About Love (2nd assistant director)
2002: Die Another Day (2nd assistant director)
2001: The Infinite Worlds of H.G. Wells (TV series) (Second AD)
2001: Captain Corelli's Mandolin (assistant director)
2001: The Hunt (TV movie) (2nd assistant director)
2001: Late Night Shopping (2nd assistant director: 2nd unit)
2000: Quills (2nd 2nd assistant director)
2000: Jason and the Argonauts (TV movie) (Second AD)
2000: Don Quixote (TV movie) (2nd assistant director)
1999: A Christmas Carol (TV movie) (2nd assistant director)
1999: Rhinoceros (TV movie) (2nd assistant director)
1999: Alice in Wonderland (TV movie) (First AD: 2nd unit)
1999: Parting Shots (3rd assistant director)
1998: Shakespeare in Love (3rd assistant director)
1998: Basil (3rd assistant director)
1998: Human Bomb (TV movie) (3rd assistant director)
1998: Merlin (TV mini-series) (3rd assistant director)
1997: The Borrowers (3rd assistant director)
1997: The Designated Mourner (3rd assistant director)
1997: The Woman in White (TV movie) (3rd assistant director)
1996: Hamish Macbeth (TV series) (3rd assistant director)
1996: The Famous Five (TV series) (3rd assistant director)
1995: Stick with Me, Kid (TV series) (3rd assistant director)
1995: The Ant & Dec Show (TV series) (production assistant)
1995: An Awfully Big Adventure (production assistant)
1994: Downwardly Mobile (TV series) (production assistant)
1994: Fall from Grace (TV movie) (production assistant)
1993: El marido perfecto (production assistant)
1992: Hostage (production assistant)

For a list of films of television series Eva Green has worked on, check out his profile on IMDB.

This article was written and published by Anders Frejdh in January 2012.

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6 MARCH 2010
DIRECTOR LEWIS GILBERT'S 90TH BIRTHDAY

FSWL celebrate Lewis Gilbert, the multi-awarded James Bond director, on his 90th birthday. Gilbert directed three of the biggest productions in the James Bond series - You Only Live Twice (1967), The Spy Who Loved Me (1977) and Moonraker (1979).

With this page, we would like to send our sincere best wishes to a beloved director and human being.

"Dear Lewis: Warm regards from Sweden with love. Your work stands for itself."

About Lewis Gilbert:
Lewis Gilbert was born in 1920 and began his career as a director while attached to the US Army Air Corps in the Second World War. He went on to direct over 40 films, besides the three James Bond movies he directed classics like Sink the Bismarck! (1960) and Shirley Valentine (1989) (co-starring Joanna Lumley). Also a prolific writer and producer, Gilbert’s numerous awards include two BAFTAs (Reach for the Sky (1956) and Educating Rita (1983)) and a Golden Globe (Friends (1971)). His 1966 movie Alfie was nominated for numerous Academy Awards.

In 1997 Gilbert was appointed a CBE for his achievements in film, and five years later directed his final picture, Before You Go (2002) with Dermot Crowley ("Major Kamp" in Octopussy) in one of the roles.

In April 2010, Lewis came out with his autobiography titled All My Flashbacks in which he stated that The Spy Who Loved Me was the highlight of his career.

Wherever he lives in the world, he remains a loyal supporter of Arsenal Football Club.

Editor's note:
Lewis Gilbert's brother-in-law, actor Sydney Tafler, portrayed the "Liparus" Captain in TSWLM.

For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
Lewis Gilbert inscribing his autography to "From Sweden With Love" after an interview in London. © 2010 Wolfgang Thürauf. All rights reserved.

Read more about Lewis Gilbert and the films he worked on Wikipedia:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Gilbert

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VIC ARMSTRONG (2nd UNIT DIRECTOR)

Stuntman, stunt coordinator and 2nd Unit Director who has worked on seven James Bond films

The first time I saw the world's most prolific stuntman, Vic Armstrong, was during an on-stage interview at National Film Theatre in London in May 2009. The session was entitled "Stunt Masterclass with Vic Armstrong" and part of the centenary celebrations of Cubby Broccoli's birth.

Vic has worked with some of the greatest directors of modern cinema, doubled for the leading stars in Hollywood, co-ordinated the best stunts in some of the biggest blockbusters of all time and has been awarded an Oscar for his services to film, as well as an honorary BAFTA for lifetime achievement.

There's so much talent and hard work behind the career of the great man that we prefer to use a reliable source, the biography from Vic's personal website:

"Vic Armstrong has worked in motion pictures for over thirty years, as a world-renowned Stuntman, Stunt Coordinator and Director. His resume reads like a "who's who" of film history, including some of the most popular films of all time.

Following his stunt debut as an accomplished horse rider, doubling Gregory Peck in Stanley Donen's "Arabesque," Vic went on to work as stunt performer in countless movies, commercials and television shows in and around Europe. His earliest work included stunts on the "Peter Cook and Dudley Moore Show," "Chitty Chitty Bang Bang," and some of the classic James Bond films, such as Live and Let Die (1973), On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) and You Only Live Twice (1967).

His reputation for precision and talent with the most complicated of stunts, earned him the opportunity to become a Stunt Coordinator, beginning with his work on the 1968 British film, "Figures In The Landscape," for Joe Losey, and continuing with epics such as "A Bridge Too Far," "Young Winston," and the first two "Superman" films, in which he also doubled Christopher Reeve.

His skill made him a popular double for several other leading men, including Sean Connery, Donald Sutherland, Timothy Dalton, George C. Scott, Malcolm McDowell, Roger Moore, Richard Chamberlain, George Lazenby, Ryan O'Neal, and Jon Voight.

His resemblance to and friendship with Harrison Ford, established on the film, "Raiders of the Lost Ark," merited Vic the opportunity to double Ford and Stunt Coordinate throughout the "Indiana Jones" film series, making Vic (along with George Lucas) one of only two creative members to work on all three segments of the film's trilogy, plus all three seasons of the "Young Indiana Jones" TV series.

As a Second Unit Director and Stunt Coordinator, his creative vision has lent itself to films helmed by some of the world's most respected and prominent directors, such as Steven Spielberg, Paul Verhoeven, Peter Yates, Sir Richard Attenborough, Roland Joffe, Ridley Scott, Michael Cimino, Irving Kirshner, and Michael Caton-Jones.

It was, in fact, his association with George Lucas, that led him to his directorial debut, on the second season premiere of the "Young Indiana Jones Chronicles." Ironically, it was in that episode that Vic directed Christopher Lee, whom he doubled in the "Hammer" horror films.

In his first directorial feature, the 1994 film, "Joshua Tree," the casting of George Segal also proved to be an ironic throwback to Vic's stunt days, as he had doubled the veteran actor in the British release, "A Touch of Class." The international success of "Joshua Tree," proved that Vic's expertise and finesse in creating action sequences are not lost on a worldwide audience. The venture equally established him as a talented principal director, whose guidance illicited a more personal side of the film's lead actor, Dolph Lundgren.

Vic's extensive body of work includes films of all genres and size, including: "The Mission," "Empire of the Sun," "Black Beauty," "Johnny Mnemonic," ,:Terminator 2, " "An American Werewolf in London, " "Double Impact, " "Tai Pan", "Dune", " "The Phantom, " "Air America, " "Universal Soldier", "Return of the Jedi," "Blade Runner," "Henry V," and "Rob Roy."

His re-teaming with Paul Verhoeven on "Starship Troopers" proved a great success as has his most recent exploits on the box office superstars Tomorrow Never Dies (1997), "Entrapment" and The World Is Not Enough (1999).

Recent films Vic has worked on include "Charlie's Angels", "Captain Correli's Mandolin", "The Four Feathers" and "Mission Impossible 3" starring Tom Cruise."

Other James Bond stunt people featured on FSWL:
>Bill Weston
>Bob Anderson
>Doug Robinson
>Eunice Huthart
>George Leech
>Greg Powell
>Jim Dowdall
>Lars Lundgren
>Malcolm Weaver
>Martin Grace
>Mickey Baker
>Nick Gillard
>Nick Wilkinson
>Paul Weston
>Remy Julienne
>Rocky Taylor
>Roy Alon
>Sarah Donohue
>Terry Richards
>Trevor Steedman

Photos below::
(Top) Vic Armstrong interviewed on stage at National Film Theatre, London, May 2, 2009 © Anders Frejdh

(Bottom) "Premiere 2nd Unit": Editor Anders Frejdh with Vic Armstrong attending Bondstars Christmas Party at Pinewood Studios, November 27, 2011 © Ajay Chowdhury. All rights reserved.

This and photos published by Anders Frejdh in December 2011.

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28 APRIL 2009
A CONVERSATION WITH GUY HAMILTON

Guy Hamilton in conversation with Janice Forsyth at King's College Conference Centre in Aberdeen, Scotland.

Having worked as Assistant Director on two of the classic films in cinema history, Carol Reed's The Third Man (1949) starring Orson Welles, and John Huston's The African Queen (1951) with Katherine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart, Guy Hamilton went on to direct four James Bond films, including GOLDFINGER (1964) and DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER (1971) starring Sean Connery, and LIVE AND LET DIE (1973) and THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN (1974) starring Roger Moore. He also directed one of the foremost Cold War thrillers, Funeral in Berlin (1966) starring Michael Caine.

His other films include An Inspector Calls (1954) with Alastair Sim, The Colditz Story (1955) with John Mills, and Battle of Britain (1969) starring Laurence Olivier and Susannah York.

Guy Hamilton will be interviewed by BBC Movie Cafe presenter, Janice Forsyth.

Editor's note:
For other Bond related news presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Book tickets for this event:

www.abdn.ac.uk/directorscut/profiles/hamilton/

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#guy_hamilton

MARC FORSTER (DIRECTOR)

Director of QUANTUM OF SOLACE 2008

The first time I met Swiss director Marc Forster was on the set of Quantum of Solace in Bregenz, Austria in April-May 2008 where I was working as an extra.

>Read a report from Marc's Stockholm visit

About Marc Forster:
A BAFTA and Golden Globe nominated director who made his directorial debut in 2000 with a psychological horror movie entitled EVERYTHING PUT TOGETHER, which he also co-wrote. The film premiered at the 2000 Sundance Film Festival and Forster went on to direct a string of critically acclaimed blockbuster hits including, most recently, THE KITE RUNNER based on Khaled Hosseini ‘s best seller.

Although born in Germany, Forster was raised in Switzerland where he attended the famous Institut Montana Zugerberg. However, his early ambition was to make films and in 1990 he moved to America to study film at New York University. Forster commented, “When you grow up like that and suddenly you decide you intend to make movies, everybody says it’s impossible, but here I am and I’m living my dream.”

Today, Forster’s impressive filmography includes MONSTERS BALL (2001), which received two Oscar nominations with Halle Berry winning Best Actress, and FINDING NEVERLAND (2004); a film based on the semi -autobiographical story of the friendship between J.M. Barrie and the single mother who lived next door with her four boys. FINDING NEVERLAND, starring Johnny Depp and Kate Winslet, received seven Academy Award nominations, five Golden Globe nominations and 11 BAFTA nominations all including Best Picture. Forster was also nominated Best Director by his peers at the Directors Guild Of America.

In 2005 Forster helmed the reality bending thriller STAY starring Ewan McGregor and Naomi Watts and went on to direct hit comedy STRANGER THAN FICTION, with Will Ferrell, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Dustin Hoffman, Emma Thompson and Queen Latifah, the following year.

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Guy Hamilton (director of Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die & The Man with the Golden Gun)
Irvin Kershner (director of Never Say Never Again)
John Glen (2nd Unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker (1979) and Director of For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Lee Tamahori (director of Die Another Day)
Lewis Gilbert (director of You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker)
Michael Apted (director of The World Is Not Enough)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Other people involved in Quantum of Solace that we have met:
>Anatole Taubman (Elvis)
>Daniel Craig (James Bond)
>David Decio (M's sentinel)
>Eva Green (Vesper Lynd)
>Jesper Christensen (Mr White)
>Judi Dench (M)
>Mathieu Almaric (Dominic Greene)
>Michael G. Wilson (man sitting in chair in Haitian hotel lobby)
>Rachel McDowall (CIA Flight Attendant)
>Tim Piggott-Smith (British Foreign Secretary)

Phot below:
Marc Forster in Stockholm 2008. Photographer: Marie Regmert. © From Sweden with Love. All rights reserved.

Text written and published by Anders Frejdh in October 2008

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30 SEPTEMBER 2007
AN INTERVIEW WITH DIRECTOR JOHN GLEN

The Founding Editor of From Sweden with Love (Anders Frejdh) caught up with director John Glen to talk about his career in films and in particular his work on the James Bond films which spanned 30 years.

From On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) to Licence to Kill (1989) Glen worked with three of the actors who has portrayed 007 - George Lazenby (1969), Roger Moore (Bond between 1973 and 1985) and Timothy Dalton (1987-1989).

>Click here to read the interview with John Glen

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors featured on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
John Glen and Mary Stavin during the filming of Octopussy in India. © 1983 Danjaq S.A. & MGM/United Artists Pictures. All rights reserved.

For more information about John Glen's film career, check out his IMDB profile:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0322515/

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JOHN GLEN (DIRECTOR)

Editor & 2nd Unit Director for OHMSS, TSWLM, MOONRAKER. Director of FYEO, OCTOPUSSY, AVTAK, TLD, LTK

I have been fortunate to meet John Glen several times over the years. Always a pleasure as he is a lovely man and among the inner circle of people behind the successful phenomenon.

In September 2007 I was given the opportunity to interview John exclusively for From Sweden With Love & Roger Moore's official site.

>Exclusive interview with director John Glen

In 2001, John Glen published his autobiography For My Eyes Only: My Life with James Bond which we strongly encourage every Bond and film fan to read!

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Guy Hamilton (director of Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die & The Man with the Golden Gun)
Irvin Kershner (director of Never Say Never Again)
Lee Tamahori (director of Die Another Day)
Lewis Gilbert (director of You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker)
Marc Forster (director of Quantum of Solace)
Michael Apted (director of The World Is Not Enough)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Photo above:
John Glen interviewed at NFT in London in May 2009 as part of a Cubby Broccoli centenary celebration. © From Sweden with Love.

Text written and published by Anders Frejdh in November 2008

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LEWIS GILBERT (DIRECTOR)

Director of YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE 1967, THE SPY WHO LOVED ME 1977 and MOONRAKER 1979

Over the years, I have been lucky to meet Lewis Gilbert many times. Mr Gilbert is a dear and funny man, and still going strong.

One of the times I saw him was during his on-stage interview at NFT in London on May 2, 2009. The session was entitled "MOONRAKER + Lewis Gilbert in Conversation" and part of the centenary celebrations of Cubby Broccoli's birth.

For Your Eyes Only (1981) had been announced as the next Bond film in the closing credits of The Spy Who Loved Me (1977), but with the success of sci-fi hits Star Wars and Close Encounters, Broccoli instead decided to produce Moonraker (1979) (1979) in which Bond blasts off into space aboard a shuttle. Michael Lonsdale is compelling as megalomaniac villain "Hugo Drax" and Bernard Lee makes his last appearance as "M".

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Guy Hamilton (director of Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die & The Man with the Golden Gun)
Irvin Kershner (director of Never Say Never Again)
John Glen (2nd Unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker (1979) and Director of For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Lee Tamahori (director of Die Another Day)
Marc Forster (director of Quantum of Solace)
Michael Apted (director of The World Is Not Enough)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Photo above:
Lewis Gilbert interviewed at NFT in London as part of a Cubby Broccoli centenary celebration, May 2009. © From Sweden with Love.

This text was published by Anders Frejdh in May 2009

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GUY HAMILTON (DIRECTOR)

Director of GOLDFINGER, DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER, LIVE AND LET DIE and THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN GUN

It was an absolute pleasure to meet the legendary James Bond director Guy Hamilton for the first time during Autographica at Radisson Edwardian Hotel near Heathrow Airport in October 2005.

In my eyes, Guy is very much responsible for the continued success of the James Bond film series. I could tell after seeing him that he is a very gentle and respectable man, much to the delight of everyone who met him.

Another opportunity to meet this gentleman and active golf player was at the Vue Sur Bond event in Canadian Quebec City during a weekend in February 2006. During the dinner, Guy was joking with me how much he prefer Norwegians before Swedish people.

Over the years, me and Guy have built up quite a friendship and I consider him to be one of the nicest people around.

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Irvin Kershner (director of Never Say Never Again)
John Glen (2nd Unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker (1979) and Director of For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Lee Tamahori (director of Die Another Day)
Lewis Gilbert (director of You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker)
Marc Forster (director of Quantum of Solace)
Michael Apted (director of The World Is Not Enough)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Photo above:
Yours truly with Guy Hamilton in Mallorca 2008. © From Sweden with Love. All rights reserved.

Text written and updated by Anders Frejdh in August 2008

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IRVIN KERSHNER (DIRECTOR)

Director of NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN 1983

Our man in Belgium, Bernard VandenDriessche, met up with famed director Irvin Keshner at Collectormania 7 in Milton Keynes in May 2005.

Bernard kindly provided the picture below of him and Irvin. He said that Irvin was a nice and friendly person and that it was wonderful to shake hands with the legendary director. (Besides being the director of Never Say Never Again (1983) he also directed The Empire Strikes Back (1980), which is considered by fans to be the best film in the Stars Wars saga.)

Sadly, Irvin Kershner passed away on November 27, 2010, due to cancer. Read the obituary.

Other cast & crew members from Never Say Never Again on FSWL:
>Bill Weston (stuntman)
>Doug Robinson (stuntman)
>Edward Fox (actor)
>Gavan O'Herlihy (actor)
>George Leech (stuntman)
>Jim Dowdall (stuntman)
>Norman Wanstall (dubbing editor)
>Pamela Salem (actress)
>Rocky Taylor (stuntman)
>Valerie Leon (actress)
>Vic Armstrong (stunt coordinator)
>Wendy Leech (stuntwoman)

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Guy Hamilton (director of Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die & The Man with the Golden Gun)
John Glen (2nd Unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker (1979) and Director of For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Lee Tamahori (director of Die Another Day)
Lewis Gilbert (director of You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker)
Marc Forster (director of Quantum of Solace)
Michael Apted (director of The World Is Not Enough)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Text written and updated by Anders Frejdh in November 2010

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MICHAEL APTED (DIRECTOR)

Director of THE WORLD IS NOT ENOUGH 1999

I attended the Royal premiere of The World Is Not Enough at Odeon Leicester Square in London with my syster in November 1999 and saw Michael Apted there. He was accompanied by Denise Richards.

Not a very long meeting as one can understand but a nice memory for me as it is not every day one sees a real Bond director in person.

About Michael Apted:
"Michael Apted was born in Aylesbury on 10 February 1941, the son of a Norwich Union surveyor. Through scholarships, he was able to attend the City of London School and then go on to read History and Law at Cambridge, where his friends included Trevor Nunn and John Cleese. In 1963 he joined a six-month apprenticeship scheme at Granada TV in Manchester, and stayed with the company for the next seven years. During this rich and fertile period, Apted went from researcher to director and worked on over fifty productions, from early episodes of Coronation Street (ITV, 1960-) to dramas written by Jack Rosenthal, Alun Owen and Colin Welland.

One of Apted's first jobs after completing the training scheme was as a researcher on Granada's flagship documentary series World in Action, where he made his mark with a special edition entitled Seven Up (ITV, tx. 5/5/1964), which charted the fortunes of a group of seven-year-old British children. Such was its success that follow up programmes have been made every seven years since then, with Apted as director, producer and presenter. The latest in the series, provisionally entitled 49 Up, is due to be shown in 2005.

In 1970 Apted decided to go freelance and spent the next two years directing plays for the BBC as well as the ITV companies. He made his cinema debut in 1972 with The Triple Echo, an adaptation of an H. E. Bates story set in 1942 about a young soldier who deserts and falls in love with a farmer's wife who tries to hide him by passing him off as her sister. The film was not a commercial success, but Apted was chosen by producer David Puttnam to direct Stardust, a sequel to Claude Whatham's That'll be the Day (1973), which looked at how the character played by David Essex becomes a pop music icon in the 1960s as part of a band not too different from the Beatles.

After the success of Stardust, Apted, Puttnam and screenwriter Ray Connolly re-united to adapt Connolly's novel Trick or Treat, which began shooting in Rome with Stéphane Audran and Bianca Jagger in the lead roles. However, filming was never completed and Apted moved on to The Squeeze, a thriller about an alcoholic ex-detective (Stacy Keach) who has to try and rescue his ex-wife and her daughter from a gang of thieves. Although the film is made up of all the familiar ingredients of the private eye genre - sex, violence, a comic foil for the fallen hero (a comparatively low-key performance by Freddie Starr) - Apted's eye for detail and his interest in female characters give the film a unique resonance, as does his ability to shift dramatic gears effectively.

Agatha (1979), Apted's next film, is a much more decorous and gentle crime film, a fictionalised embroidering of the true case of the disappearance of mystery writer Agatha Christie in 1926. Largely set in Harrogate and filmed in many of the real locations involved, such as the Old Swan Hotel and the Bath Spa, it benefits from the atmospheric cinematography of Vittorio Storaro and a first rate performance by Vanessa Redgrave. But it proved to be a troubled production for Apted. One of the producing partners was First Artists, an actors' co-operative set up by, amongst others, Dustin Hoffman, whose insistence on being inserted into the film, as Christie's (fictitious) love interest, necessitated many re-writes.

In 1980 Apted was invited to America by Ray Stark to work on a project called BAM, which never came to fruition. While there however, he was offered the chance to make Coal Miner's Daughter (US, 1980), a bio-pic of country singer Loretta Lynn, for which Sissy Spacek would win an Oscar, and which proved to be a tremendous commercial and critical success. Subsequently, Apted chose to move to California, returning regularly to work in the UK and oversee the education of his children. In 1982 he made one of the first Channel Four films to get a cinema release, P'tang, Yang Kipperbang, a story about children growing up after the war which re-united him with David Puttnam and Jack Rosenthal.

Since then, Apted has continued to make films, TV programmes and documentaries in the US, but he was also responsible for two big budget productions made in Britain: the nineteenth James Bond film The World is not Enough (1999), and an adaptation of the Robert Harris novel about the Bletchley Park code-breakers, Enigma (UK/US/Ger/NL, 2001). In the former, one can see Apted's hand in the use of real places within the story (the real MI6 building and the Millennium Dome in London, the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao) and the greater role played by women in the narrative, including the first female villain (as opposed to henchwoman) of the series. Enigma was a long- time in the making, with funds eventually coming from the Netherlands, Germany, the UK and the US. Made with Apted's consummate professionalism, the film is something of a throwback to Hitchcock's spy thrillers of the 30s and 40s.

Though he has made more films in the US than in Britain, Apted's varied output has consistently exhibited his interest in socially relevant themes, while his consistently sympathetic treatment of women can be seen throughout his work, from The Triple Echo right up to his most recent film, the Jennifer Lopez vehicle Enough (US, 2002). His willingness to return to documentaries, such as Incident at Oglala (US, 1991), which explores the factual basis of his hard-hitting feature film, Thunderheart (US, 1992), displays an active, questioning intelligence rarely found among mainstream Hollywood directors."
- By Brian McFarlane for The Encyclopedia of British Film in 2003.

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Guy Hamilton (director of Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die & The Man with the Golden Gun)
Irvin Kershner (director of Never Say Never Again)
John Glen (2nd Unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker (1979) and Director of For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Lee Tamahori (director of Die Another Day)
Lewis Gilbert (director of You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker)
Marc Forster (director of Quantum of Solace)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Other cast & crew from The World Is Not Enough that we've met:
>Andrew Noakes (financial controller)
>Anthony Waye (line producer)
>Barbara Broccoli (producer)
>Chris Corbould (special effects supervisor)
>Colin Salmon (actor)
>David Arnold (soundtrack composer)
>Denise Richards (actress)
>Desmond Llewelyn (actor)
>Don Black (lyricist of "The World Is Not Enough")
>Goldie (actor)
>Jim Dowdall (stuntman)
>John Cleese (actor)
>John Richardson (miniatures)
>Judi Dench (actress)
>Keith Hamshere (stills photographer)
>Lindy Hemming (costume designer)
>Maria Grazia Cucinotta (actress)
>Michael Kitchen (actor)
>Michael G. Wilson (producer)
>Monty Norman (Composer of the James Bond theme)
>Nina Muschallik (actress)
>Oliver Skeete (actor)
>Pauline Hume (end titles)
>Peter Lamont (production designer)
>Pierce Brosnan (James Bond)
>Robbie Coltrane (actor)
>Robert Carlyle (actor)
>Rocky Taylor (stuntman)
>Samantha Bond (actress)
>Sophie Marceau (actress)
>Terry Cade (stuntman)
>Terry Richards (stuntman)
>Vic Armstrong (stunt coordinator)

Photo above:
Michael Apted during the filming of The World Is Not Enough. Photo by Keith Hamshere. © 1999 Danjaq, LLC and United Artistis Corporation. All rights reserved.

This text was published by Anders Frejdh in September 2004

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LEE TAMAHORI (DIRECTOR)

Director of DIE ANOTHER DAY 2002

I have never met Lee Tamahori face-to-face but when I attended the World premiere of Die Another Day in November 2002 I saw him on stage inside Royal Albert Hall in London.

Other James Bond directors that FSWL has encountered:
Anthony Waye (1st assistant director on For Your Eyes Only & Octopussy (1983))
Arthur Wooster (2nd Unit director on For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Guy Hamilton (director of Goldfinger (1964), Diamonds Are Forever, Live and Let Die & The Man with the Golden Gun)
Irvin Kershner (director of Never Say Never Again)
John Glen (2nd Unit director on On Her Majesty's Secret Service, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker (1979) and Director of For Your Eyes Only, Octopussy, A View to a Kill, The Living Daylights & Licence to Kill)
Lewis Gilbert (director of You Only Live Twice, The Spy Who Loved Me & Moonraker)
Marc Forster (director of Quantum of Solace)
Michael Apted (director of The World Is Not Enough)
Toby Hefferman (2nd assistant director on Die Another Day, Casino Royale & Quantum of Solace)
Vic Armstrong (2nd Unit director on Tomorrow Never Dies, The World Is Not Enough & Die Another Day)

Other people involved in Die Another Day that we have met:
>Colin Salmon (Robinson)
>David Decio (Mr Kil's PA)
>Deborah Moore (Air Hostess)
>Halle Berry (Jinx)
>Ian Pirie (Creep)
>John Cleese (Q)
>Judi Dench (M)
>Madonna (Le Chiffre
>Michael G. Wilson (General Chandler)
>Oliver Skeete (Concierge)
>Pierce Brosnan (James Bond)
>Rachel Grant (Peaceful)
>Rick Yune (Zao)
>Rosamund Pike (Miranda Frost)
>Samantha Bond (Moneypenny)
>Toby Stephens (Gustav Graves)

Text written and published by Anders Frejdh in September 2004

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14 AUGUST 2002
EDITOR AND DIRECTOR PETER R. HUNT (1925-2002)

Peter R. Hunt, British film editor/director who edited the first five James Bond movies (Dr No (1962), From Russia with Love (1963), Goldfinger (1964) (1964), Thunderball (1965) (1965) and You Only Live Twice (1967)) before he was offered the job as director for On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969), passed away on 14th August 2002, aged 77.

The film editor and director Peter Hunt was associated with the huge success of the James Bond movies, the longest-running series in the history of the cinema. He edited the first five Bond films - generally considered the best - creating a style of sharp cutting that has been emulated by many editors and directors of action movies.

He also directed one, On Her Majesty's Secret Service (1969) starring George Lazenby, by many considered to be the best film in the 007 series. The inexperienced Australian model carried the can for the film's comparative box-office failure, but Hunt was praised for his pacy, and seemingly effortless, direction.

"I first met Peter in 1947 whilst a junior editor at London Films Shepperton. Peter was then an assistant editor. Unknown to me, Peter had watched my career unfold as an editor and second unit director on TV series such as Danger Man. When he needed a director to film the bob run sequence in Switzerland he contacted me and managed to convince Harry and Cubby that I was the man for the job." - John Glen (2nd Unit Director on OHMSS)

"Peter and I worked together on 11 productions. I first met him on Sink The Bismark in 1960 as I was assisting the sound editor on the film, (the legendary) Win Ryder. I so wanted to return to working with picture rather than sound and it was quite by chance that Peter's assistant was moving onto other things so we teamed up. He was never too proud to accept any ideas I offered up and after a while he allowed me to assemble scenes which he would later fine-cut. When the budget on Dr No could not afford two sound-track editors he didn't hesitate to promote me to take on the sound-effects job. It was a massive promotion, unheard-of at that time. He made a very early decision on Dr No that the film was to 'keep moving' and his contribution to those early Bonds was enormous. He could be ruthless at times and I was sad to see Editor Thelma Connell shunted off You Only Live Twice when Peter returned from directing the 2nd Unit. We parted company when he went on to direct OHMSS and I fulfilled my dream of becoming a film editor. I was shocked years later when I saw him interviewed on TV and it was obvious he had a very serious health problem. He was without doubt a very talented film-maker." - Norman Wanstall (Oscar® winning Dubbing Editor)

"A gentleman and an actor’s director who always said - Let me see you act and I’ll cut it great.”
- Terence Mountain (Raphael in OHMSS)

Peter Hunt obituary:
Born in London on March 11, 1925, Hunt learned his craft from an uncle who made government training and educational films. His first claim to fame was, in fact, appearing on a recruiting poster for the Boy Scouts Association when he was 16, and he read the lesson at Lord Baden-Powell's funeral. At 17, he joined the army, and was almost immediately shipped off to Italy, where he took part in the battle of Cassino.

After the war, he returned to work with his uncle, before becoming assistant cutter for Alexander Korda, and a fully fledged editor with Hill In Korea (1956). He worked with both Terence Young and Lewis Gilbert on a number of films prior to editing their Bond efforts.

Already with a decade of editing behind him, Hunt only reluctantly agreed to edit the first Bond film, Dr No, in 1962. "I was really not interested in doing it at all," he recalled. "But, then I thought, well, if the director is Terence [Young], and I know him well enough, and I find him rather nice, maybe it will be alright." Previously, Hunt had suggested to Harry Saltzman that, in his search for an actor to portray James Bond, the producer look at the film he had just edited, the feeble army comedy On The Fiddle (1961), in which Sean Connery played a Gypsy pedlar.

The editing style of the Bond movies was established because, "if we kept the thing moving fast enough, people won't see the plot holes," what editors call "chets", or cheated editing tricks. "On Dr No, for example, there was a great deal missing from the film when we got back from shooting in Jamaica, and I had to cut it and revoice it in such a way as to make sense."

It was from then that Hunt decided to use jump cuts and quick cutting, and very few fade-ins, fade-outs and dissolves, which "destroy the tension of the film". The fight between Connery and Robert Shaw on board the Orient Express, in From Russia with Love, took a total of 59 cuts in 115 seconds of film.

Besides editing, Hunt directed some second-unit work on the Bond films, as well as the title sequence for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang (1968). "I had a terrible time in the cutting room on You Only Live Twice, with Donald Pleasance as Blofeld. Lewis [Gilbert] had made him into a camp, mini sort of villain. If you look at the film very carefully, Pleasance doesn't walk anywhere, because he had this mincing stride. He was so short that he looked like a little elf beside Connery. I used every bit of editing imagination I could so that he could be taken seriously as a villain."

Many purist Bond fans regret that Hunt never directed another 007 movie. His determination to be more faithful to the Ian Fleming original, even down to the death of the heroine (Diana Rigg) and the scaling down of gadgetry, puts On Her Majesty's Secret Service above many subsequent films in the series. It also happened to be the best picture he directed.

There followed two overlong adventure yarns set in Africa with Roger Moore, Gold (1974) and Shout at the Devil (1976). A couple of macho movies with Charles Bronson, Death Hunt (1981) and Assassination (1986); and the dispensable Wild Geese II (1985). But the work began to dry up, a situation that depressed the normally ebullient and energetic Hunt. In 1975, he settled in southern California with his partner Nicos Kourtis, who survived him.

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo ovan:
Inscribed autograph from Peter Hunt to Anders Frejdh from FSWL's private collection.

Read more about Peter Hunt's career in films, check out his profile on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0402597/

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#in_memoriam

8 SEPTEMBER 1994
BOND DIRECTOR TERENCE YOUNG (1915-1994)

Terence Young, British film director, producer and screenwriter - born in Shanghai June 20, 1915 and married with one son and two daughters - passed away in Cannes September 7, 1994, and the Bond world had lost one of its greatest.

The British cinema - as opposed to the British film industry - first began to consider its responsibilities during the Second World War. The quantity and vitality of British films produced between 1945 and 1950 is astonishing, with the serious variety attracting large audiences as never before. Between them, the benevolent flour milling mogul Arthur Rank and the creative Hungarian paterfamilias Alexander Korda encouraged new talents, none of whom was more promising than Terence Young.

"I can't say enough about Terence Young. I adored him and loved working with him. He was one of the most elegant gentlemen I have ever met with a very mischievous playful side."
- Martine Beswicke (Zora in From Russia with Love & Paula Caplan in Thunderball)

Academy Award winning Dubbing Editor Norman Wanstall remembers working with Terence:

"As Peter Hunt's assistant I had little personal contact with Terence but I could see he was ideal to direct a Bond film as he had the image of a Fleming 'Bond' himself. He was respected and loved by the crew and we were a very happy team.

My closest contact with him was the sad occasion when we went to London together to re-record certain lines with Pedro Armendáriz before he returned to the States. I had no idea at the time that Pedro was very seriously ill so I treated the occasion as just another post-sync session. Terence obviously knew that we needed to record the lines before it was too late, and to Pedro's credit he was totally professional in the way he delivered his lines. It didn't seem possible that within days of returning to the States Pedro took his own life.

Another memorable occasion was when we were dubbing From Russia with Love and we'd reached the scene where Bond was in the gypsy camp in Turkey which had been shot on the back-lot at Pinewood Studios. I knew the scene had to sound Turkish so I'd booked a number of Turkish men and women to come to the Studio and we had a great session recording them reacting throughout the scene in their own language. Terence was so impressed and happy when he heard genuine Turkish voices throughout the whole scene that he gave me a lot of praise. That's the sort of man he was."

About Terence Young:
Young's first two films as director, for Rank, came out early in 1948, proving him anxious to work well outside the British mainstream. One Hour With You, with a typically playful script by Caryl Brahms and SJ Simon, imagined the misfortunes of Patricia Roc wooed by the tenor Nino Martini while stranded in Italy. Corridor of Mirrors gave even more meaning to the words bizarre, baroque - as Eric Portman, at his most magniloquent, brooded over a Renaissance painting in his dark mansion, convinced that he and his mistress, Edana Romney, are reincarnations of the lovers in it.

Earlier Young had worked as screenwriter on some interesting films with the director Brian Desmond Hurst. First On the Night of the Fire (1939), a fugitive-from-justice tale, heavily influenced by Marcel Carne, and then Dangerous Moonlight (1941), a wartime love affair between a Polish airman and an American journalist with the 'Warsaw Concerto' thrown in as a bonus. Hungry Hill (1946), Daphne du Maurier's chronicle of an Irish family with Margaret Lockwood as its matriarch; and Theirs is the Glory (1946), a semi-documentary account of the failure of the Battle of Arnhem. During service with the Armoured Guards Division Young was given leave to work with Clive Brook on the screenplay for On Approval (1944), based on Frederick Lonsdale's comedy and as directed by Brook, with himself, Beatrice Lillie, Googie Withers and Roland Culver, a happy version of a filmed play.

Young's first job with Rank was to hack a screenplay out of Mary Webb's novel Precious Bane, which he was scheduled to direct with Stewart Granger and Jean Simmons, but, Rank got cold feet at the last minute and transferred him to a comedy with Granger, Woman Hater (1948). Young's other film that year, They Were Not Divided, was a project dear to his heart, as it followed two Welsh Guardsmen from a drill on a barracks square to D-Day and beyond.

In 1954 he directed That Lady, the story of the romance of the one-eyed Princess of Eboli which scandalised the court of Philip II. Young blamed the film's failure on the fact that that he had asked for Laurence Olivier and Ava Gardner, but had been given Gilbert Roland and Olivia de Havillland. With Zoltan Korda he then co-directed Storm Over the Nile (1955), a remake of 1939 The Four Feathers with footage from that stretched out for Cinema Scope.

Young had already experienced his most important career move. Two American producers, Irving Allen and Albert R. Broccoli, taking advantage of US tax concessions for working abroad, came to Britain with Alan Ladd to make The Red Beret (1953), in which Ladd was an American officer who does a T. E. Lawrence-like stint in the ranks of the British regiment. They had admired Young's work on his war movies and though he won no kudos for this one it was popular. He stayed with their company, Warwick Films, establishing himself as a director of transatlantic action movies.

He broke away for another personal project, Serious Charge (1959), in which a vengeful Teddy boy accuses a vicar of sexual assault. He then accepted the challenge of bringing four of Roland Petit's ballets to the big screen in Black Tights (1961). Maurice Chevalier introduced these diverse pleasures, including Moira Shearer and Petit in Cyrano de Bergerac, Cyd Charisse as a merry widow and Zizi Jeanmaire with him in Carmen.

Its success was not unqualified, and Young went on to co-direct, with Ferdinando Baldi, Orazi E Curiazi (1961), with Alan Ladd decidedly ill-at-ease as Horatio at the bridge. Cut, dubbed and retitled Duel of Champions, it got a few bookings some years later.

By that time Young's career had soared. Broccoli had teamed up with Harry Saltzman to film Dr. No (1962), the sixth 007 novel by Ian Fleming about the British secret service agent, James Bond. Saltzman, the American backer of such films as Look Back in Anger, had been looking for something more evidently popular. Apart from the two of them nobody believed in it, including the distributor (United Artists), who imposed budget restrictions; half a dozen actors turned down the role before it was accepted by the little-known and unlikely Sean Connery. (Young had previously directed Connery in 1957 in a small role in Action of the Tiger.) The notices were mediocre and Fleming was privately contemptuous, but the film went on to knock the box-office for six. With an injection of humour and Connery splendidly easing himself into the role, From Russia with Love (1963) and then Thunderball (1965) proved that Young was a first-rate action director and that the public couldn't get enough of 007.

When Young abandoned Bond, it was with mixed results. The Amorous Adventures of Moll Flanders (1965) was an attempt by Marcel Hellman to duplicate the success of Tom Jones. But Warner Bros then put Young in charge of an adaptation of a long-running play, Wait Until Dark (1967), with Audrey Hepburn menaced by thugs, including a scarey Alan Arkin - and that is surely one of the best thrillers of the decade.

Young followed it with an Italian version of The Rover (1967), which has been little seen despite the presence of Rita Hayworth and Anthony Quinn, and Mayerling (1968) with James Mason and Ava Gardner under-used as Franz Joseph and Elisabeth and Omar Sharif and Catherine Deneuve as the lovers. Several other co-productions with either France or Italy included The Valachi Papers (1972), a Mafia tale with Charles Bronson.

Young's long-delayed first Hollywood film, Klansman (1974), with Richard Burton and Lee Marvin, was scathingly received - one reason why Paramount pulled the plug on The Jackpot, also with Burton, during production. But that company invited Young back for Bloodline (1979), based on a Sidney Sheldon bestseller which managed to combine a plot about company greed with one about the making of porn movies. Audrey Hepburn and James Mason headed the cast, and after the dreadful notices, she commented that she had made it both because the locations didn't take her far from her family and because she liked the director.

Young attracted Olivier to Inchon (1980) and The Jigsaw Man (1983), in which he respectively played General MacArthur and an admiral involved with Michael Caine, a former head of MI6 who had defected. Inchon was financed by the Rev Sun Myung Moon to an estimated 100 Million dollars but only took peanuts in the US and never had a cinema release in the UK. The second ran into financial difficulties during filming and went direct to video.

This is a sad ending to an extraordinary career. No one would class Young with his contemporaries David Lean and Carol Reed, but he was one among others embraced by Hollywood: Michael Anderson, J. Lee Thompson, Ronald Neame, Ken Annakin and Lewis Gilbert. They gave Hollywood some excellent films and the American film industry liked them because they thought in commercial terms.

Editor's note:
For other James Bond directors presented on From Sweden with Love, click here.

Photo above:
Terence Young with Sean Connery (James Bond) and Mollie Peters (Patricia Fearing) on the set of Thunderball. © 1965 Danjaq S.A. & United Artists Corporation. All rights reserved.

For more information about Terence Young's directorial career, check out his profile on IMDB:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0950109/

Tags:

#directors
#in_memoriam

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